Dunkel Radio Loves Glenn Underground's – 'Atmosfear' (1996)


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Taking into consideration the time the album was produced in, Glenn Undergrounds album 'Atmosfear' has a very futuristic sound. Glenn pioneered this particular sound, which has inspired a lot of current house producers and it contains everything from dreamy jazz-inspired house to hand-raising, booty-shaking Chicago house.

Chicagoan Glenn Underground also known as Glenn Crocker was born in 1971. He was raised on disco classics and jazz music and started playing the piano at very a young age. Glenn started producing in the late 80’s and early 90’s and he has released a total of 14 albums and 87 EPs. His first EP ”Different Sides” was released on the legendary Chicagoan dance music label Dancemania in 1992 and Glenn has since gone on to produce some of the most sophisticated and respected deep house ever. One of the leading pioneers in the underground dance music scene, ‘Atmosfear’ was his first full-length album, released in 1996 on Peacefrog Records.

It has been described as “one of the jewels in Deep House music” and the album has this dusty sound that's incomparable. It is basically built with old drum machines, vintage synthesizers and samples from old jazz and funk records. Glenn’s simple but soulful piano playing puts the final touch on the album and gives it certain dynamics that house music usually neglects. In other words, Glenn did one hell of a job!

For me personally, this album has been an inspiration when it comes to producing and definitely helped define the way I understand house music. It can be listened to as chill-out music on a lazy Sunday, but it is also one of the best dancefloor-killing records so far. Glenn has produced a lot of other remarkable albums and EP’s, but in my opinion this record is the sound of Glenn Underground.

This was the first track I heard from the album. It has been one of my favorite house-tracks ever since. Quite simply amazing.

Words: Andreas Rosendal